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5 simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils

5 simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils

5 simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils

One of the most difficult tasks for plants is to get rid of the pests that have attacked them. Pests like millipedes are difficult to eradicate, and once you have removed or killed millipedes from your potted plants, you should keep them away from your plants forever. In this article, a number of useful methods to keep millipedes away from houseplants are described, which we read below. In this article we are going to provide simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils.

5 simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils

1. Use vegetable oils (essential or volatile)

Concentrated vegetable oils may not kill millipedes, but they can prevent millipedes from entering the pot. Tea tree oil and peppermint oil are among the vegetable oils that are effective against millipedes. These oils have a strong odor that millipedes do not like.

Before spraying these oils on the soil, you should make a diluted mixture of them with water. If you use these oils alone, their high concentration will burn the roots of your plant.

How to use :

To prevent the millipede from entering, spray the oil and water mixture on the soil of the pot as well as the leaves of the plant. Vegetable oils have a strong odor, so do not spray it in a place that is often visited by humans and pets. Also, if you are growing potted vegetables and use such essential oils, be sure to wash the vegetables well after harvest.

5 simple ways to prevent millipedes from entering plant soils

2. Always keep the potting soil clean

The leaves and plant material that fall on the soil of your pot create a humid environment beneath which attract millipedes. They enjoy eating decaying plants such as leaves, stems, roots and rotten fruits. It is best to remove such plant material from the soil as soon as possible so that they do not have a chance to attack your potted plants.

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3. Be careful when watering your plants

Another situation that can create a humid environment that attracts millipedes is the high water content in the soil of your pot. You should avoid over-irrigating the soil. Be sure to water the soil only when it is 1-2 cm below the surface.

If your potted plants are placed in a pot, be sure to drain the plant every day after watering. If you leave water in the tray or under the pot, millipedes will be absorbed into the pot. It is better to water your potted plants in the morning. This helps the potting soil to get the moisture it needs before sunrise. The heat of the sun evaporates excess moisture from the soil surface as well as the leaves. This discourages millipedes from building a house on the potted plant.

If you can only water the potted plants in the evening, be sure to water only the potting soil. Avoid spraying water on the leaves and if you have done so, clean it so that it does not stay on the plant overnight. You can sprinkle some crumbs on the soil of your pot as this will help absorb excess surface moisture.

4. Set aside cracked pots

If your pots have cracks, it will be a millipede production site. It is best to check your pots every day for cracks or fissures and fix them with eyes or other items. If the crack is too large to be removed, it is best to replace the pot.

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5. Use organic repellents

Cayenne pepper is a natural inhibitor of many pests, including millipedes. You can make some fresh cayenne pepper and grind it into a powder or buy the powder directly. Sprinkle the powder on the soil of the pot to prevent the millipede from entering the soil of the pot.

You can also use pure sulfur powder to prevent millipedes from forming in your potted plants. Sprinkle the powder on the soil of the pot to make them. The only problem with using sulfur is its bad smell. Therefore, you should use sulfur only when the plants are outdoors and away from home.

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