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Avoiding fruit worms in your plants with codling moth

Avoiding fruit worms in your plants with codling moth

Avoiding fruit worms in your plants with codling moth

How to avoid fruit worms in your plants with codling moth? Apples have become one of the most well-known fruits in our diets, but they’ve traveled a long way from Eurasia’s highlands to kitchen tables all across the world. Pears, peaches, and quinces are all members of the rose family (Rosaceae), which also contains apples. Growers along the Silk Road have been cultivating and trading fruits for over a thousand years.

Fruit worms

How to avoid fruit worms in your plants with codling moth? The rise in popularity of apples coincided with the unintended expansion of a minor but damaging pest: the apple codling moth (Cydia pomonella). The codling moth starts out as a worm, and virtually everyone has encountered a worm in their fruit. We typically encounter images of a pleasant green worm within a large red apple as youngsters.

Codling moths

Depending on the temperature and environment in the area, codling moths can have up to two generations every year. Codling moths can have up to four generations between spring and fall if conditions are right. Male and female mature moths are gray or brown in color and 1/2 to 3/4 inch long. On the wings of male codling moths, there is some bronze banding and spotting.

Avoiding fruit worms in your plants with codling moth

Codling Moth Life Cycle

Adult female moths emerge from their winter pupation locations in early spring, when the first fruit blooms appear, to lay oval-shaped eggs that hatch in six to 14 days. A single female moth may deposit up to 100 near-transparent eggs that are difficult to see! The eggs of the first generation are usually found on leaves. Female moths will continue to emerge and deposit eggs on various areas of the tree, including the bark and fruits, throughout the growing season.

Types

As with many insects, the voracious larva stage of this moth’s lifecycle is the most damaging. A newly hatched codling moth larva has a black head and a cream-colored body and is about 1/10th of an inch long. As the larva grows older, it will develop a little pink hue and can reach a length of 1/2 to 3/4 inch. Codling moth larvae eat directly on the kernel of walnuts. The larvae of pome fruits such as apples and pears dig into the flesh of the fruit to feed on the seeds.

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Codling moth larva

Full-grown codling moth larvae will leave the fruit to pupate after 3-5 weeks, leaving behind a mound of feces known as brown frass.  Apples have become one of the most well-known fruits in our diets, but they’ve traveled a long way from Eurasia’s highlands to kitchen tables all across the world. Pears, peaches, and quinces are all members of the rose family (Rosaceae), which also contains apples.

Avoiding fruit worms in your plants with codling moth

CYD-X

How to avoid fruit worms in your plants ? You can use CYD-X which is very effective and it is an organic control. In order for CYD-X to affect a codling moth larva’s digestive tract, they must consume it.

Three to seven days

How to avoid fruit worms in your plants with codling moth? After three to seven days, the virus will kill the larva. Carefully time your pesticide treatments. After you detect evidence that the first generation of eggs has hatched, thoroughly spray the fruits. Spray weekly till harvest until the end of the growing season. In commercial and home orchards, CYD-X is currently permitted for organic cultivation.

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Environmental control

Sanitation is a critical component in pest control. Because most apples require many trees to cross-pollinate in order to fruit, a codling moth infestation on one tree will surely spread to nearby trees. As your fruits mature, inspect them frequently for indications of codling moth and remove any damaged fruits as soon as possible.

May and June

To reduce possible codling moth habitat, pick up any fallen fruit and clean the area at the base of the tree. Pay special attention from May to June, when the moth season is at its best.

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