Garden plants

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Be careful before buying invasive plant species. Manual control can be used in three ways to prevent the spread of an invasive plant species. Hand-pulling, digging, flooding, mulching, burning, removal of alternate hosts, and manual destruction or removal of nests, egg masses, or other life stages are examples of manual control tactics.

How to avoid invasive plant species

How to avoid invasive plant species? These methods are most effective in small groups or in places where chemicals or motorized equipment are prohibited. To decrease or eradicate the target population, manual control measures must be persistent, and many treatments may be required. Manual control may become labor consuming and hence uneconomical if infestations grow too widespread.

Digging

How to avoid invasive plant species? To prevent resprouting, dig or hand-pull the entire root. It’s best used on small or immature plants, in sandy or loose soils, or when the soil is moist.

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Smothering

How to avoid invasive plant species? Smothering: Cover target plants for at least one growth season with mulch, black plastic, carpet, or any other impenetrable barrier. Cutting the target plants first and then burying them increases the efficacy of this approach. If you’re working with a cloning species, be sure to cover all of the species’ stems.

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Flooding

How to avoid invasive plant species? Flooding: Only when water levels can be controlled to completely cover cut plants for a length of time is this viable. The level of water required and the length of time cut plants should be submerged varies per species.

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Here’s a list of plants to avoid buying and/or planting if you don’t want to propagate a problem plant. Be careful before buying invasive plant species.

Butterfly Bush

Buddleja davidii (Butterfly Bush): This plant spreads like wildfire thanks to wind-borne seed and thrives in moderate coastal conditions. If you already have it and can’t bear to let it go, cut off the flowers after they’ve bloomed, before they set seed. Some newer cultivars, according to the nursery industry, do not spread. Before you buy, read the labeling carefully.

Wildflower seed

Toadflaxes (Linaria dalmatica or vulgaris), bachelor buttons (Centaurea cyanus), and viper’s bugloss are among the wildflower seed mixtures (Echium vulgare). All three of these species have been observed in wildflower mixtures. Each may quickly spread, especially in hot, dry microsites, and have become major issues in various parts of Eastern and Southern Oregon.

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Yellow flag iris

This big, yellow iris is still offered as an aquatic plant, but it spreads along streams, rivers, and ponds, choking out natural wetland flora that wild animals rely on. I live beside the Marys River and have noticed big areas of vegetation sprouting along the river’s edge in otherwise pristine terrain.

Be careful before buying invasive plant species

Brooms and gorse

Brooms and gorse (Cytissus and Ulex) are two yellow-flowering plants that grow in dense thickets. Some decorative broom types are still available in nurseries, primarily outside of the state.

Ribbongrass

Ribbongrass (Phalaris arundinacea var. picta) is a big, variegated grass with beautiful green and white leaves that grows aggressively near water. In riparian regions like the Metolius River, it’s becoming a concern.

Botanical barbarians

Many additional invasive species are still available for purchase. Avoid holly, English and Irish ivy, Russian olive, purple loosestrife, and other similar plants… I could go on forever. Supporters of native plants refer to them as “botanical barbarians.” There are many wonderful native plants that may be utilized in place of exotics in the landscape. Planting indigenous will aid local pollinators, birds, and animals in their survival.

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