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How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle?

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle?

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle?

Fruit is harmed by the larvae of the raspberry bug. The larva feeds on the fruit’s stem end. Summer-fruiting raspberries are the most affected. Autumn raspberries’ early fruits may be destroyed, but those that mature after late August are less likely to be impacted.

How to recognize

A mature beetle is pale brown in color, about 4mm long, and has short hairs on its body. The 8mm grubs have a creamy-white body with pale-brown markings on the back, a brown head, and three pairs of legs.

More about raspberry beetles

A beetles emerge from the soil between April and June and are excellent flyers. They eat rose family flowers first, such as apple, pear, and hawthorn, before moving on to soft fruit to lay their eggs in the blooms. The grubs eat on the fruit’s outer layer before moving inside the center plug. The grubs leave the ripe fruit when they are completely developed, fall to the ground, and pupate in the soil.

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle?

Control

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle? Consider taking control measures before the crop matures if raspberry beetle has been a problem in recent seasons. As fruit grows on vulnerable plants, check them often so that action may be done before a harmful population forms. When considering control alternatives, start with the techniques in the non-pesticide control section to minimize harm to non-target species.

Pesticide and non-pesticide

If this is not suffice to decrease the damage to acceptable levels, insecticides may be used. Pesticides with lower persistence (which are generally certified for organic cultivation) are less likely to harm non-target animals than those with greater persistence and/or systemic action.

Non pesticides control

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle? Tolerate minor beetle damage if feasible; generally, just a tiny percentage of the crop is damaged. Berries that mature later are less impacted. In the garden, attract predators and other natural enemies such as birds, hedgehogs, and ground beetles. Agralan, Ken Muir, Harrod Horticultural, and other vendors sell a host plant odour (karimone) water trap. This will catch both male and female beetles, perhaps reducing the infestation.

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Pesticide control

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle? Spraying raspberries when the first pink fruits appear, followed by a second application two weeks later, has been recommended in the past; however, plants should not be sprayed when in blossom owing to the threat to pollinating insects, thus spraying may be inadvisable. Natural pyrethrin-based organic contact insecticides. To get excellent control, many applications of these short persistence compounds may be required.

How to protect your berries from raspberry beetle?

RHS Gardening Advice

When applying insecticides, read the label carefully. On edible plants, check the label to see if the food plant is specified, and follow the directions for the maximum number of treatments, spray interval, and harvest interval. Because of the threat to bees and other pollinating insects, plants in bloom should not be treated. The inclusion of a pesticide product does not imply that RHS Gardening Advice recommends or endorses it. It’s a list of items accessible to home gardeners right now.

What if I don’t want to use a bug spray?

A By the time the fruit is ready to pick, the majority of grubs will have left the fruit or will have been removed with the plug. As the fruit is prepared, the others, as well as any damaged portions, should be removed.

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What is the extent of raspberry beetle damage?

Beetle can do severe harm to the blossoms if they are present in sufficient numbers, resulting in many fruits being deformed or not growing at all. The larvae, on the other hand, are considerably more of a concern since the young grubs ruin the fruit. They leave distinctive dried-out and blackened patches around the plug in the center, indicating that they have eaten part of the developing drupelets, which are the small segments that make up this type of fruit.

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