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Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

Do you know why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan? Plant as soon as you receive it. Our “signature bulb” is the red spider lily, and we enjoy watching it flourish for our customers. In the fall, the red spider lily blooms on a bare stem and then puts up winter leaves. During the summer, this foliage becomes dormant again. After a lengthy summer dormancy, fall blossoms emerge, ensuring that this perennial blooms year after year.

The leaves of the Red Spider Lily

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan? The leaves of the Red Spider Lily need at least a half-day of winter sun to grow. Remember that this sun may be found under trees that shed their leaves in the winter in areas that would normally be in direct sunlight in the summer. During the winter, the foliage soaks up the sun’s vitality as it prepares to become dormant for the summer.

The T’ang dynasty

This plant is abundant along highways and along the borders of fields in western Japan, although it was introduced from China, like so many other aspects of Japanese life, possibly around 700 AD under the T’ang dynasty. The Japanese keep track of the seasons by having different plants represent each season. Throughout the year, the nightly news generally includes pieces about what plants are in bloom.

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

The cherry blossoms

The cherry blossoms in spring are the most important, but many other flowers usher in the changing seasons. The crimson spider lily is the bloom that marks the start of fall on the spring equinox.

Behavior

These triploid red spider lily bulbs are hardworking mules! The red spider lily has shown to be one of the strongest heritage bulbs in the Southeast, withstanding drought and high summer heat for decades. We’ve even seen them flourish in hot climates like Bakersfield, California.

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

It easily multiples

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan? The red spider lily bulb easily multiplies with new bulb offsets. It also produces bigger blooms and more bulbs than its current Japanese equivalent. The blooms are said to blossom two weeks after the first decent autumn rain. It has been reported that if there is no rain in September, the bulbs would not blossom at all.

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Rule of thumb

The red spider lily foliage stays green throughout winter and into late April, following the bloom. Plant most bulbs at a depth of three times the bulb’s height as a reasonable “rule of thumb.” They are prone to not blooming in their first year. This happens frequently when the bulbs spend too much time out of the ground, which is required for shipping. However, once they’ve established themselves in your garden, they’ll be there for the rest of your life!

Why red spider lily is a mysterious flower in Japan

Under orders from President Millard Fillmore, Commodore William Perry opened the ports of Japan in 1854 aboard some of the United States Navy’s first steam-powered ships. Captain William Roberts, who had a great eye for horticultural gems, was on board one of the fleet’s ships. Captain Roberts collected three bulbs of a plant with red spidery type flowers while in Japan. The bulbs were in such a dry state that they did not exhibit indications of life until the War Between the States. These three bulbs thrived in their new habitat in North Carolina before spreading over the southern United States.

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Are Red Spider Lilies resistant?

While deer will devour just about everything, red spider lilies are more resistant to their appetites than many other garden ornaments. They don’t bother with the leaves, but they are drawn to the brilliant coral orange/red blooms. They often leave them alone, although they will occasionally consume them. So, depending on how hungry the deer are, the answer to this issue is that they are generally resistant. Tulips were eaten by humans during times of starvation and famine, but they aren’t on our menu either.

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